Resources

This page provides various resources of help to commercial and recreational beekeepers.

Click here to view various submissions the NSW Apiarists' Association has made on behalf of our members.

Also, see our Links page for information on other organisations that work to support NSW beekeepers in various ways.

Click here to view the latest B-qual newsletter.

DPI Information

Available Apiary Sites

The DPI are pleased to announce the upcoming next release of available Apiary sites via the Expressions of Interest process. 

Around 50 vacant apiary sites on LLS Travelling Stock Routes and Reserves around NSW will be offered with locations in the Murray, South East, Central West and Northern Tablelands regions. 

The sites will be published on a map on the DPI website on the 30th of January. Visit this page on the 30th for a link to this map and the form to apply for sites. Sites will be available to apply for on the website for four weeks.

You can read more about the EOI application and allocation process on the DPI website

To prepare for the EOI you can scan or download the following documents you will require for an application:

·Insurance Policy documents including $20m of Public Liability Insurance.

·A completed declaration of compliance with the Biosecurity Code of Practice.

·Completion certificates for the PHA Biosecurity Online Training (“BOLT”) or the DPI Pests & Diseases course.

If you have any further questions about the EOI don't hesitate to contact us on apiary.sites@dpi.nsw.gov.au 

Nick Geoghegan | Program Coordinator, Apiary Sites
Intensive Livestock
NSW Department of Primary Industries | Agriculture
Locked Bag 21 | 161 Kite St | Orange NSW 2800 
T:   +61 2 6391 3464

2015-2019 Association Business Plan

After consultation with the membership and refinement of the information gathered, a business plan for the Association's operations has been recently ratified by the Executive Committee. Click here to view the business plan.

Apiary sites on public lands - a position paper

The NSW Apiarists' Association has been liaising with the Forestry Corporation to put in place a state wide beekeeping policy similar to that that has been in place with the National Parks and Wildlife Service for a numbers of years.

This position paper was created to highlight the importance of the apiary industry and the necessity for it to have access to public lands. It is hoped that this will provide government departments and interested stakeholders with a thorough understanding of these issues.

Position paper

Click here to view the 'Apiary sites on public lands - a position paper'

Reporting a honey bee pesticide event

An increase in the number of managed hives available for crop pollination is crucial to the continued prosperity of the Australian agricultural industry. Further development of the managed pollination sector will also provide important opportunities for the honey bee industry. However, a significant barrier in this regard has been the risk that beekeepers face in relation to honey bee pesticide poisoning.

It is essential that any beekeeper who experiences a poisoning event from chemicals applied to flowering plants, spray drift or anything else report the incident immediately to the

Environmental Protection Agency

Phone: 131 555 or click here

Or to the

Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA)’s Adverse Experience Reporting Program

Phone: 1800 700 588 or click here

BeeAware

Further information on responding to poisoning events can be found by visiting the BeeAware website – click here

Biosecurity Manual for the Honey Bee Industry

Online biosecurity course for beekeepers

Commercial beekeepers with more than 50 hives can register for a free online biosecurity course on activities to prevent the spread of pests and diseases in their hives.  

The Biosecurity for Beekeepers course, which takes about 90 minutes to complete, covers:

• checking hives for pests and diseases

• identifying exotic and established pests and diseases of honey bees

• taking action after finding a serious pest or disease in their hive

• minimising the impact of pests and diseases on their hives.

The Australian Honey Bee Industry Biosecurity Code of Practice requires commercial beekeepers (with 50 or more hives) to complete such an approved biosecurity training every three years.  They can do the course for free by contacting their local Bee Biosecurity Officer to obtain a token code.  

Beekeepers with less than 50 hives, who will also find the course useful, will need to pay $20 to complete it.

Visit the BeeAware website for more information on the:

The Biosecurity for Beekeepers course is delivered by Plant Health Australia through funding from the Australian Honey Bee Industry Council. The development of the course was funded by AgriFutures Australia.

 

Honey Bee Biosecurity Manual 

The Biosecurity Manual for the Honey Bee Industry provides information for the industry and producers about biosecurity practices and honey bee pests.

National Best Practice for Beekeeping in the Australian Environment

Even thorough the beekeeping industry has a clear objective of preserving native flora, the industry’s position on access to government lands in particular is tenuous and needs a strong proactive stance to counter extreme negative views. By adopting a National Best Management Practice for Beekeeping in the Australian Environment, the beekeeping industry is in a more favourable position to demonstrate that it has a thorough understanding of its environmental impacts, and can adequately manage these.

National Best Practice for Beekeeping in the Australian Environment

Join the Hive

Mailing list